Gender in Ann Veronica: A Critical Discourse Analysis

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Zhino J. Abubakr
Lubna F. Ahmed

Abstract


This study investigates the differences that can be detected in the language produced by male and female talk. The study’s specific focus is on gender performance by both interlocutors. It concentrates on the way gender is represented in the 20th century British novel by considering social, cultural and ideological factors. The data used for such analysis is a modern British novel “Ann Veronica,” which is written by H. G. Wells, a feminist writer, in 1909. The approach that is used for the analysis is Critical discourse analysis, which is used to investigate the way the characters in the novel perform gender, which also concentrates on revealing gender ideologies and gender power that cause gender inequality. The study also uses conversation analysis to show the organization of the conversation between the characters, male and female, which explain how the conversation is opened and closed and how the sequences are arranged between the characters. The most important conclusions are: gender stereotypes that cause gender inequality are performed in British society. Women are constructed as inferior to men. The study also concludes that women’s gender identities are only limited to domestics. Besides, men have the most power in the society; that is why women are not allowed to be free and independent.



 

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How to Cite
Abubakr, Z. J. and Ahmed, L. F. (2020) “Gender in Ann Veronica: A Critical Discourse Analysis”, Koya University Journal of Humanities and Social Sciences, 3(1), pp. 8-13. doi: 10.14500/kujhss.v3n1y2020.pp8-13.
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Articles
Author Biographies

Zhino J. Abubakr, Department of English, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, Koya University, Kurdistan Region, Iraq

Zhino Jawhar Abubakr was born and grew up in Koya. She obtained her B.A. degree in English Translation Department in 2013 at Koya University. She was employed in the same year and in the same university and worked in different positions. Currently, she works as a University-Private Sector Internship Coordinator. In 2017, She started studying for a M.A. degree in English linguistics, and currently, she is in her last stage of getting the certificate. She has participated in many workshops and training since the day she started working at Koya University.

Lubna F. Ahmed, Department of English, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, Koya University, Kurdistan Region, Iraq

Lubna Fadhil, obtained the B.A. in English Language from University of Baghdad in 1992. She had been appointed as an Assistant Researcher in English Department, College of Education for Women, University of Baghdad in 1993.  She had been obtained the M.A degree in English Language, Linguistics- Stylistics from English Department, College of Education for Women, University of Baghdad.  The field of her specialization is Linguistics-Stylistics.  She taught various classes at University of Baghdad, English Department e.g. Syntax, Phonology, Essay Writing, and so on. She started teaching at University of Koya in 2006. She has obtained Ph.D. degree in English Language-Linguistics in the Department of English, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, University of Koya in July 2013. In addition to teaching in undergraduate and postgraduate studies, she is currently a member of the scientific committee in English department, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, Koya University.

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